/drublic - A Cutting Edge Webdesign Blog – Hans Christian Reinl

Front-End Development and Architecture

Hans Christian Reinl – @drublic

Category Archives: CSS

Introducing CSS Modal

by
CSS Modals in action

In the last couple of months I’ve worked on several projects that needed an overlay with some content on it. Some front-end frameworks as for example Bootstrap refer to them as modals.
You can find a lot of implementations that do exactly what I search for but they all have one major drawback: They rely on JavaScript.

Yes, sure, everyone has JavaScript enabled these days but why use a technique that you don’t necessarily need for a given problem? Also most implementations have drawbacks when it comes to mobile devices and responsive web design in general or accessibility. Apart from that they add a lot of code, that is not necessary for a lot of pages. Others might add dependencies such as for example jQuery which you don’t need at all on your micro-site.

To tackle these problems I decided to write my own implementation of a modal that fulfills what I need.

Modals built out of pure CSS

CSS Modal is the result of this experiment.

Here is what is cool about it:

  • CSS Modal is built out of pure CSS while JavaScript is only for some sugar.
  • The modals are designed using responsive web design methods.
  • It is accessible, cross-browser, media-adaptive, small and fast!

Another cool thing is that you can use CSS Modal as Sass plugin and apply it to your custom classes using Sass placeholders.

Visit the website     View an example

Check out the website to get documentation and more examples. The project is on GitHub so if you use it and find bugs, please report them.

General feedback is also very welcome. Please tweet me!


Printing The Web

by
Printable Websites - some books

While it is possible to consume nearly all means of content on your smartphone or tablet it seems like the dream of a paperless office comes true for a lot of web developers. But digital natives are not the only ones who are on the web. There are still some people that like to print web sites on paper. Once you are aware of that you might want to include a dedicated print stylesheet into web sites you build. Here is some advice on what you can do to get the best out of your page. Disclaimer: This article was

Read more


The REM Fallback with Sass or LESS

by

Since a while now word has spread to use the CSS unit rem for font-sizes and values in CSS. Here I want to explain how you can use a fallback in Sass or LESS to get rem working in all browsers. View Gist with mixins Why rem? Let’s look into what rem means. We know of the em unit which is relative to the font-size of the parent element it is defined on. This means if one of the parents in the DOM-tree changes its font-size, the font-size of the child element changes too. In contrast the rem unit is

Read more


HTML5 Boilerplate – v4.0.0

by

HTML5 Boilerplate is out with the new version 4.0.0. There were some significant changes since the last version that are listed up in the changelog (also see below). Most of them because of the excellent work by Nicolas Gallagher – thanks for leading HTML5 Boilerplate with such great effort. What’s new? This was done throughout the last seven months of development and resolving bugs: Add documentation in a separate folder – everything that is directly concerned with the project was moved from the wiki Switch from Public Domain to MIT license Separate Normalize.css from the rest of the CSS Improve

Read more


An Approach on Building an Advanced Initial Boilerplate

by

Since some time I found myself defining a good starting point for a new project over and over again. While I use HTML5 Boilerplate in nearly all of my projects it’s not enough as an initial package. Since I’m using SASS (in its dialect SCSS) and have some other things I define over and over again I decided to set up a package that lets me start easily and includes a lot of tools that are necessary for my projects. This is an introduction to init, the starting point for projects that require a bit more than just HTML5 Boilerplate.

Read more



SASS vs. LESS →

by

“Which CSS preprocessor language should I choose?” is a hot topic lately. I’ve been asked in person several times and an online debate has been popping up every few days it seems. It’s nice that the conversation has largely turned from whether or not preprocessing is a good idea to which one language is best. Let’s do this thing.

Really short answer: SASS

Slightly longer answer: SASS is better on a whole bunch of different fronts, but if you are already happy in LESS, that’s cool, at least you are doing yourself a favor by preprocessing.

Chris Coyier finds an answer to what preprocessor is the better one by pointing out what the advantages of each preprocessor are. And as it turns out SASS is winning the race because it has more power and better features. So if you are asked why you use SASS, you might want to link people to this post.


My Coding Style and Guidelines

by

After Harry Roberts published his HTML/CSS coding style I’ve decided to follow his call and write down how I like to code and what my guidelines for HTML and CSS coding are. This article is only a way to describe what I like to do – but it is by far not a recommendation or something. I have not really tried to “canalize” the coding style I do before but it is about time to do so and to write it down. Please let me know if you think that there are ways to do certain things better or in

Read more


RECESS – A CSS cleaning tool build on top of LESS →

by

Developed at Twitter to support our internal styleguide, RECESS is a simple, attractive code quality tool for CSS built on top of LESS.

Incorporate it into your development process as a linter, or integrate it directly into your build system as a compiler, RECESS will keep your source looking clean and super managable.

As I think reading the source is essential for developers to become good at what they do viewing this source in readable style is essential too. RECESS is a tool which helps you developing good-looking CSS with LESS. It is developed at Twitter and has now been open-sourced.

RECESS is a Node.js module and is maintained by @fat. You can find out more about it by viewing the source at GitHub.

BTW: I’ve decided to not minimize and concatenate my blog’s source anymore. So, feel free to dig deep!


About CSS Variables

by

Please read about the updated syntax of CSS variables in the first and second update of this post. Since a little bit more than a month (as of the time of writing) there is a Editor’s Draft for a CSS Variables Module by Google (Tab Atkins and Luke Macpherson) and Daniel Glazman. Just a few days ago the Working Draft was updated. The first draft was written in 2008 by Daniel Glazman but was not added to the official specification. The new WD extends this proposal by Glazman. Disclaimer: This article is part of a small series about the latest

Read more